B Blesiya 3D Printer Parts 40W UV LED Light Panel Source Lamp With Purple Light & hole

Since 2017 year we have had a good reputation. Please feel free to buy. Blesiya is getting better and better in the future!

Description:

– Adopting new LED lamp beads, sufficient illumination and good printing effect

– Name: 40W LED copper plate integrated UV DLP printer light source violet

– Applicable: light curing printer

– Wavelength: 405nm

– Power: 40w

Package Includes:

1x 40W UV LED Light Source with hole

Product Features

  • Adopting new LED lamp beads, sufficient illumination and good printing effect
  • Name: 40W LED copper plate integrated UV DLP printer light source violet
  • Applicable: light curing printer
  • Wavelength: 405nm
  • 1x 40W UV LED Light Source with hole

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GEEETECH A10 3D Printer Aluminum Prusa I3 Half Assembled DIY Kit with Print Size 220×220×260mm,OPEN SOURCE GT2560 control board

Printing parameters
Printing technology: FDM
Build volume: 220*220*260 mm³
Printing accuracy: 0.1mm
Positioning precision: X/Y:0.011mm. Z: 0.0025mm
Printing speed: 180 mm/s (max)
Filament diameter: 1.75mm
Nozzle diameter: 0.4mm
Filament: ABS / PLA /flexible PLA/wood-polymer/PVA/HIPS/PETG, etc.
Temp:
Max temp for hotbed: 100℃
Max temp for extruder: 250℃

Software resources
Operating system: Windows, MAC, Linux
Control software: EasyPrint 3D, Repetier-Host, Simplify 3D, Cura, Slic3r, etc.
Remote App: EasyPrint 3D App (with an optional 3D WiFi module)
File format: .STL, G.code

Electrical
Power supply:Input: 115V/230V,Output: DC 24V, 360W
Connectivity: Wi-Fi (with an optional 3D WiFi module), USB cable,
SD card (support stand-alone printing)
Display screen: LCD 2004

Mechanical:
Frame: Aluminum profile
XY Rods: Wear-resistant aluminum profile
Z axis: Lead screw
Stepper Motors: 1.8°step angle with 1/16 micro-stepping

Physical Dimensions & Weight
Machine Dimension: 478 x 413 x 485mm³
Shipping box Dimension: 500 x 470 x310 mm³
Machine Net weight: 7.6kg
Machine Gross weight: 9.45 kg

Product Features

  • 1. Fast Self-assembly: Just takes about 10 minutes to install the Z-plane kit on the XY plane and wiring. Simple and convenient.
  • 2. With its build volume as 220*220*260mm³, A10 makes the best of the building platform and gives you a full view of the printing details.
  • 3. Good Adhesion of Building Platform: Silicon carbide glass with microporous coating as A30 building platform, without the need of attaching the masking tape. Freeing you from the headache of first layer warping.
  • 4. The V-shaped wheels and rails on each axis, made from wear-resistant aluminum profile, could, in a large measure, reduce the printing noise.
  • 5. A10 comes with OPEN SOURCE GT2560 control board, providing limitless space for you to modify the firmware and tinker with your printer.

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GEEETECH A30 3D Printer with Super Large Print Size: 320×320×420mm and Power Failure Recovery, 3.2″ Full-color Touch Screen, Good Adhesion of Building Platform, SMARTTO open source firmware, Support 3D Wifi Module, Half Assembled DIY Kit.

Note:If you want to achieve the function of Auto Leveling, you need to buy a capacitive proximity sensor. The printer doesn’t support 3d touch sensor.

Printing Specifications:
Print technology: FDM
Build volume: 320*320*420mm
Printing accuracy: 0.05mm
Positioning precision: X/Y:0.11mm. Z:0.0025mm
Printing speed: 80-110mm/s recommended
Filament diameter: 1.75mm
Nozzle diameter: 0.4mm
Filament: PLA, ABS, wood polymers, etc

Software:
Operating system: Windows, MAC, Linux
Control software: EasyPrint 3D, Cura,Repetier-Host,Simplify3D
File format: STL,OBJ,Gcode

Temperature:
Max temperature for hotbed: 100℃
Max temperature for extruder: 250℃

Electrical:
Power supply: 110V/220V, 50HZ~60HZ
Display screen: 3.2″ Full-color touch screen
Connectivity: Wi-Fi (with an optional 3D WiFi module), USB, SD card (support stand-alone printing)

Mechanical:
Frame: Aluminum profile
Build Platform: Aluminum heatbed+ tempered glass
XYZ Rods: Wear-resistant aluminum profile( XY Rods) and lead screw (Z axis)
Stepper Motors: 1.8°step angle with 1/16 micro-stepping

Physical Dimensions and Weight:
Machine Dimension: 508×615.5×630.5 mm
Shipping box Dimension: 670x560x300 mm
Machine Net weight: 11.7 kg
Machine Gross weight: 14.6 kg

Product Features

  • 1, Super Large Print Size: 320mm×320mm×420mm, it enables you to print large-size 3D models.
  • 2, Fast Self-assembly: Just takes about 10 minutes to install the Z-plane kit on the XY plane. Simple and convenient.
  • 3, Filament Detector: Detect the abnormal situation of filament, such as filament fracture and outage, and trigger a signal to remind you to change printing material in time.
  • 4, Silicon Carbide Glass Building platform: Silicon carbide glass with microporous coating as A30 building platform, without the need of attaching the masking tape. It is of good adhesion, freeing you from the headache of first layer warping.
  • 5, Power Failure Recovery: It can continue to print from the same place where it stops, regardless of unexpected power failure, stopping to change the filament, stopping and print it tomorrow.

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Open source 3D printing has high rate of return on investment, Joshua Pearce says in new study

Sep 11, 2015 | By Alec

The combination of open source sharing and 3D printing technology has been a remarkably successful one, and we can’t help but wonder how unsuccessful and how limited the 3D printing community would be without open source designs and sharing platforms. While largely something that takes place outside the academic world, its go to know that we have friends within it as well. For a brand new study by Michigan Tech professor Joshua Pearce, offers a strong defense of open source 3D printing, arguing that it has a high rate of return on investment and that it will make science cheaper and more accessible.

Joshua Pearce is an associate professor of materials science and engineering as well as of electrical and computer engineering at Michigan Tech, and thus is well acquainted with the benefits of 3D printing technology. But how useful is that open source online community where so many of his students can be found? Well, in an article entitled Return on Investment for Open Source Hardware Development (published in Science and Public Policy), he finds that open source 3D printing is hugely beneficial for the scientific community.

And why? Well, in essence because science is very expensive but doesn’t have to be. However, that isn’t to say that it is free; instead, he sees open source development as free access to research results, data and papers, or the sharing of knowledge in order to refine and apply it. ‘In science, we all have this problem where we pay so much for scientific equipment that it overwhelms our budgets,’ Pearce says on his university’s website, adding that most of those budget breaking parts are mechanically quite simple and easy to 3D print on desktop machines.

So why spend millions on increasingly obsolete equipment, instead of redirecting that money towards open source tools, he wonders in his paper. The added benefit of those 3D printed parts would be that they are upgradable, adaptable and expandable. ‘Advances in low-cost electronics and 3-Dprinting enables a new paradigm of scientific equipment production where scientists in the developed and developing worlds can fabricate tools themselves from digital plans,’ he argues. Not only would this cut costs, but it would also expand the platform for scientists as funds can be directed elsewhere. Outside the lab, they could even advance innovation and diversity.

Of course, this all sounds fantastic and convincing, but how would it work practically? To illustrate this point, Pearce and his Michigan Tech Open Sustainability Technology lab quantified the concept by developing a series of open source syringe pumps – iconic tools in any laboratory, but that quickly cost thousands for an ordinary laboratory. With his team, Pearce created a set of 3D printable and completely customizable models using open source CAD software and off-the-shelf motor parts: a single pump for $97 and a double pump for $154. These files were posted on Youmagine and Thingiverse, and were downloaded 1035 times within ten months – with each download counterbalancing the cost of a purchase.

What’s more, Pearce and his team argue that their designs are far more effective than low-end pumps. ‘We know at the very least that our design is more cost-effective than low end syringe pumps,’ Pearce says. ‘You look at our syringe pump, and it’s way better than the low end ones—it matches performance of high end syringe pumps that anyone can build themselves. It’s one thing to have a cheap device, and another to have a tool you can trust to do scientific research.’

The only problem is that there’s currently no way to tack validation of quality and calibration. ‘That’s where the initial funding comes in,’ Pearce says, arguing that the National Science Foundation and National Institutes of Health (and others) could use funding for improving the possibilities for open source validation. ‘They can also build a centralized database to house that information—including the code—and make the hardware more accessible.’ While requiring an initial investment, that would be far more efficient in the long run.

So what kind of value can be attached to it? To calculate a return on the team’s investment, they attributed a value to each download – basically, taking the price of syringe pump and the cost of open source manufacturing, with the difference representing savings. Multiplied by the number of downloads, the team estimates that the return on investment for this project is between the 460 and the 12,000 percent. While not exact profits going into anyone’s pockets, it does definitely open the door to a far more efficient scientific community, that will also find expansion and progress much easier. In short, the 3D printer has a lot to offer to the academic world.

Posted in 3D Printing Applications

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