Honeystore Unisex 3d Printed Casual Summer Short Sleeve T-shirts Tees Beer XL

Honeystore Unisex 3d Printed Casual Summer Short Sleeve T-shirts Tees

Size details:
Size M: Length: 26, Shoulder: 15-19, Bust:36-46in, Waist:35-44in, Sleeve Length: 7 in
Size L: Length: 26, Shoulder: 16-20, Bust:39-48in, Waist:37-46in, Sleeve Length: 7 in
Size XL: Length: 27, Shoulder: 17-21, Bust:40-49in, Waist:39-48in, Sleeve Length: 8 in

Note: Please allow little color difference due to different camera or light environment.

Product Features

  • Size M: Length: 26, Shoulder: 15-19, Bust:36-46in, Waist:35-44in, Sleeve Length: 7 in
  • Size L: Length: 26, Shoulder: 16-20, Bust:39-48in, Waist:37-46in, Sleeve Length: 7 in
  • Size XL: Length: 27, Shoulder: 17-21, Bust:40-49in, Waist:39-48in, Sleeve Length: 8 in
  • Relax fit style, lightweight soft fabric
  • Fashion design,stylish and comfortable to wear it,great for all types of exercise,working out or just relaxing and so on

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Canadian startup OLT Footcare offering custom sandals with 3D printed midsoles on Kickstarter

Jun 8, 2017 | By Tess

OLT Footcare, a startup based in Windsor, Canada, has launched a Kickstarter campaign for its custom-made 3D printed sandals. The company is one of a growing number of footwear brands offering clients an affordable way to get their feet into comfortable, supportive, and tailor-made shoes.

When I go shoe shopping, I often dread the inevitable question “What size shoe are you?” Often, I am a 9, I say, though sometimes I’m an 8.5 or 10. In the end, I’m surrounded by a number of boxes, all containing shoes that almost fit, but are not a perfect match to my feet.

With the emergence of 3D scanning and 3D printing technologies, however, there now seems to be a way to manufacture custom shoes in an efficient (read: affordable) way. OLT Footcare is the latest company to offer clients comfortable shoes with a personalized fit achieved through 3D printing.

OLT Footcare’s sandals, which bear a similar aesthetic to the ever-trendy Birkenstock sandal, are made up of a customized full-length 3D printed midsole, a laser-cut custom outsole, and standard sandal uppers (two straps and two buckles). Each pair is made to order.

The midsoles are made based on the client’s foot measurements, which are captured using the OLT Foot Scanner, a machine about the size of a photocopier that is capable of scanning the bottom of a foot in only seconds and which can generate over 10,000 XYZ points with 0.2 mm accuracy for each foot.

For clients who cannot access the OLT Foot Scanner directly, the machine is also capable of scanning foot impressions or castings. To make things easy, OLT Footcare says it will send out a foam box which can be used to take impressions.

“We don’t guess 3D contour shape from a 2D picture of the side of a foot,” says the company. “This would be comparable to a regular 2D picture of me and asking you to guess my height. This practice doesn’t meet our standards. That’s why we only use our true 3D foot scanner.”

Once the scan of the foot is captured, a 3D model is generated. It is this model of the client’s sole that is used as a base to design the customized full-length midsole. To account for different-sized feet on a single person, two scans are taken and 2 models are made—one for each foot.

Next, a desktop 3D printer is used to manufacture the custom midsole. According to OLT Footcare, the 3D printed midsole also integrates a varying internal lattice structure, which provides different levels of support for the wearer as well as some flexibility to the sole. The sandal’s outsole is then laser cut to match the midsole, before the shoe can be assembled.

The company describes the sandal saying: “It will fit perfectly to each foot to provide ultimate comfort and the right amount of arch support. As a result, it improves your balance and distributes the body weight more evenly because they are 3D printed from the impressions or scans of your own foot.”

Through the Kickstarter campaign, OLT Footcare is offering a number of different rewards, including some geared towards reviewers. For $49, medical professionals can obtain a pair of custom sandals providing that they review them before July 22; non-professionals can do the same for a pledge of $69.

Early-bird backers with a prescription for the sandals can get a pair for $79, while the general early-bird deal stands at $99. A pair at regular price (via Kickstarter) is going for $159. Currently, the campaign is only shipping to the U.S., Canada, and Australia. Earliest deliveries are estimated for July 2017.

Check it out—your feet won’t regret it.

Posted in 3D Printing Application

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3D printed food could soon help dysphagia sufferers

May 30, 2017 | By Julia

As 3D printed food looms ever larger on the horizon, an Australian researcher is looking into the medical benefits of the phenomenon—and she’s already come up with some unexpected findings. Dr. Aarti Tobin is Team Leader for the Meat Science team at the Commonwealth Scientific Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) in Brisbane, Australia, where her research focuses on the role of 3D printed food for dysphagia sufferers.

Defined as a difficulty when swallowing food or liquids, dysphagia has been on the rise as the population gets older and older. The symptom is often linked to disease in the elderly, and is caused by issues such as reduced muscle control, stroke, neurological dysfunction, and loss of teeth. Much more than a mere annoyance, dysphagia is becoming a serious problem, leading to increased cases of malnutrition, dehydration, aspiration pneumonia, and even death.

Current solutions are unappetizing to say the least. Elderly care centres often address dysphagia by mincing or pureeing foods, which are then served with an ice cream scoop. More advanced techniques include modifying food textures, in addition to molding and restructuring food items.

While these methods do make food softer and easier to swallow for dysphagia sufferers, an obvious problem remains the lack of visual appeal. Seniors with dementia present a more serious issue: pureed and modified food often does not appear as recognizable food, meaning it is drastically less likely to be eaten.

But as Dr. Tobin recently showed at the 3D Foodprinting Conference at Monash University in Melbourne, edible additive manufacturing could present a viable long term solution. 3D printed food looks like real food, but can be made soft and palatable without sacrificing vital nutrition.

For red meat in particular, 3D printing presents a ground-breaking opportunity to add value to sub-par cuts, trims, and by-products through the development of 3D printing “meat ink.” Protein can be boosted to meet the needs of an aging population as well. (Meat & Livestock Australia drew similar conclusions about 3D printed meat earlier this month.)

CSIRO researchers have also stated that, in the years ahead, 3D printed food could help personalize our nutrition, an initiative they are already working hard on.

“Need more iron this morning after that busy weekend? What if our clever biosensing device could talk to our bench-top 3D printing food generator and create an iron-rich lunch designed especially for us? We’re starting to take sci-fi dreams like this to reality with our future science platforms,” says Pamela Tyers of CSIRO.

While 3D food printing may seem like a thing of the distant future, it’s beginning to see some real applications today, and the CSIRO additive manufacturing center, Lab 22, remains committed to applying knowledge of 3D printing in other materials (such as metal) and applying it to the world of food.

But as Dr. Tobin is quick to point out, there’s still a long way to go. New business models need to be created to best meet the demands of different markets. Personalized approaches to nutrients and textures, rather than printing the entire muscle product, is another requirement that needs to be taken into account.

Still, research organizations such as CSIRO show us that steps are already being taken towards developing, perfecting, and even standardizing the burgeoning industry of 3D printing food. In the years ahead, expect to see lots more work being done in this revolutionary field.

Posted in 3D Printing Application

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Researchers regenerate bone using 3D printed clay hydrogel

Researchers in China have released a manuscript detailing a 3D printable material specially designed to support the growth of bone cells. Matter grown with the support of this polymer/clay nanocomposite could be used in the treatment of bone defects caused by trauma, deformities, or the removal of tumors. It has also been tested in vivo with positive results.

Diagram of the process developed by researchers at Tianjin University, Chinese Academy of Sciences and the University of Hong Kong. Image via ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering, May 2017

Diagram of the process developed by researchers at Tianjin University, Chinese Academy of Sciences and the University of Hong Kong. Image via ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering, May 2017

Matching the extracellular matrix 

Hydrogels are widely used in tissue regeneration as their molecular structure resembles the naturally occurring extracellular matrix (ECM) found in living organisms. The role of an ECM, and in this case a hydrogel, is to give structure and nutrition to surrounding live cells. The right environment for support and nutrition varies depending upon the kind of tissue, e.g. arteries need a tubular structure, bone cells thrive better in porous material.

Some previous examples reported by 3D Printing Industry include a study on the combination of TPU, PLA, and graphene oxide that could be used to support bone regrowth, and soluble scaffolds 3D printed at the University of Connecticut.

This study in particular focuses on conditions conducive to bone regrowth. It does so by infusing the gel with particles of clay – a material naturally similar to human bone, and used in varying degrees to fix fractures.

Preparing the ink

The basis of the material is a hydrogen bonding, UV reactive, monomer (molecule that attaches to others) previously invented by the research team, and exhibiting highly flexible mechanical properties.

Mechanical properties of the base material. Image via ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering, May 2017

Mechanical properties of the base material. Image via ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering, May 2017

To this, the researchers add varying quantities of clay particles to manage the balance between the structure and the flow of the material as an ink.

The ink is extruded through a nozzle 250 μm in diameter (approximately the diameter of 5 human hairs) into a grid-like scaffold shape with linking parts, using a BioScaffolder 2.1 3D printer. The scaffold is then baked in a crosslink oven to connect the particles, and washed in de-ionized water to remove impurities.

The 3D printed hydrogel-nanoclay material as a scaffold (b), and gridded cylinder (c, e, f) Image via ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering, May 2017

The 3D printed hydrogel-nanoclay material as a scaffold (b), and gridded cylinder (c, e, f) Image via ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering, May 2017

In vitro and in vivo testing

Results of the tests in vitro, i.e. outside of the body in a controlled container, show positive, living, activity of rat osteoblast cells within the clay hydrogel. As a result, the researchers were able to apply the material to tibia defects in live rats.

Comparison of bone regrowth in blank (placebo) in vivo rate tests (top) and hydrogel-clay tests (bottom) Image via ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering, May 2017

Comparison of bone regrowth in blank (placebo) in vivo rate tests (top) and hydrogel-clay tests (bottom) Image via ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering, May 2017

One half of the test group had the hydrogel-clay implanted in the leg, and the other half recieved a blank, placebo, support. After 8 weeks of healing, the clay hydrogels proved to promote better regrowth of bone at the tibia.

Conclusions state that,

3D printing of the hydrogen bonding monomer with a variety of bioactive inorganic nanoparticles will open up a new avenue to construct load-bearing tissue engineering scaffolds for precision and individualized repair of bone defect and degeneration.

3D-printed high strength bioactive supramolecular polymer/clay nanocomposite hydrogel scaffold for bone regeneration was published online in ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering journal as a Just Accepted Manuscript May 17, 2017. It is co-authored by Xinyun Zhai, Yufei Ma, Chunyong Hou, Fei Gao, Yinyu Zhang, Changshun Ruan, Haobo Pan, W. Lu, and Wenguang Liu, attributable to Tianjin University, Chinese Academy of Sciences and the University of Hong Kong.

For more of the latest 3D printing related research in medicine and other uses, sign up to the 3D Printing Industry newsletterlike us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Featured image: Cracks in natural clay. Photo by Olli Jalonen, [email protected] on Flickr

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