GEEETECH A10M 3D Printer with Mix-color printing, Dual extruder design, Filament detector and Break-resuming function, Prusa I3 quick assembly DIY kit.

Printing parameters
Printing technology: FDM
Build volume: 220*220*260 mm³
Printing accuracy: 0.1mm
Positioning precision: X/Y:0.011mm. Z: 0.0025mm
Printing speed: 120 mm/s (max)
Filament diameter: 1.75mm
Nozzle diameter: 0.4mm
Filament: ABS / PLA/wood-polymer/PVA/HIPS/PETG, etc.
Temp:
Max temp for hotbed: 100℃
Max temp for extruder: 250℃
Software resources
Operating system: Windows, MAC, Linux
Control software: EasyPrint 3D, Repetier-Host, Simplify 3D, Cura, Slic3r, etc.
Remote App: EasyPrint 3D App (with an optional 3D WiFi module)
File format: .STL, G.code
Electrical
Power supply: Input: 115V/230V
Output: DC 24V, 360W
Connectivity: Wi-Fi (with an optional 3D WiFi module), USB cable,
SD card (support stand-alone printing)
Display screen: LCD 2004
Mechanical:
Frame: Aluminum profile
XY Rods: Wear-resistant aluminum profile
Z axis: Lead screw
Stepper Motors: 1.8°step angle with 1/16 micro-stepping
Physical Dimensions & Weight
Machine Dimension: 478 x 413 x 485mm³
Shipping box Dimension: 490 x 470 x290 mm³
Machine Net weight: 7.96kg
Machine Gross weight: 9.98 kg

Product Features

  • 1,Mix-color printing: Dual extruder module and 2-in-1-out hotend which delivers mix-color objects and greatly enriches your 3D printing life
  • 2,Fast Self-assembly: Just takes about 10 minutes to install the Z-plane kit on the XY plane and wiring. Simple and convenient.
  • 3,Large printing area: With its printing area as 220*220*260mm³, A10M makes the best of the building platform and gives you a full view of the printing details.
  • 4,Extruder cover features 360°ventilation design: Enhancing the dissipation of heat, greatly reduces the risk of clogging or leaking and guaranteeing excellent printing quality,
  • 5,Good adhesion of printing plate: Silicon carbide glass with microporous surface as A10M build platform without having to use Bluetape (Masked Tape). It has excellent adhesion and thus frees from the problem of detaching the first layer.

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3D Printing Pen, AONOKOY Wireless Intelligent Printing Pens for Kid 3D Arts Crafts Drawing Doodler With 3 Color 1.75mm PCL Filament Refills 50℃ Low Temperature Design Gift for Christmas (Blue)

Perfect 3D Printing Pen for Kids: No Matter Creating 3D Models, Doodling or Drawing Interesting Things. It Can Help Children to Improve Spatial Thinking Ability, to Encourage Their Creative Imaginations. It’s the Perfect Gift for all Boys and Girls. Precision Crafting and Art is Easier than Ever With the Ultimate 3D Craft Pen.

DRAW BERTICALLY – Draw Horizontally. Lift Your Imagination off the Page! The ANOKOY 3D Printing Pen Extrudes Heated Plastic Which Instantly Hardens, Allowing You to Literally Draw in 3D, Freehand or on Paper. Change Colors Quickly and Easily. The Possibilities are Endless.

SAFETY LOW TEMPERATURE DESIGN – you don’t need to worry your kids for burning.Rechargeable Avoiding the risk from the electric wires. Your children can play with it anywhere.

HOW TO USE:
★1.The Micro USB Part – Quickly and easily insert the batteries

★2.On/ Off – Slide switch,preheating 30 seconds, after waiting for lights turn green rear can use

★3.LED Lamp – Red flashing( preheatin). Green( Ready) Red( Charging in)

★4.Suction Consumables -Stay after the lights turn green Insert consumables,click the star button to inhale consumables

★The PCL material can be reused:
If you are not satisfied with the works, you can You can immerse the works in warm water of 50 ? for about 5 seconds. It can be remodeling when the material become soft. Then you can use the material again and reuse it.

Package include:
1 x 3D Printing Pen
1 x USB Adapter
10 x Drawing template
3 x 1.75mm PCL Filament
1 x User Manual

Product Features

  • 3D PRINTER – Ergonomic Body ,light and slim, easier to handle. Wireless Design good touch feeling You can easily control extrusion speed for smoother operation and endless creation.
  • LOW AND SAFE TEMPERATURE – AONOKOY 3D Printing it provides the low and safe temperature control to melt filament for avoiding of burning risk;no need to adjust temperature or speed. The default value is perfect for kids to use.
  • EASY TO USE AND MANEUVER – the Indicator light turns from red to green when it’s ready to use.after spraying out the material rapid solidification. also let you have enough time to create perfect graffiti style. It is easy to achieve the design you wish to accomplish.
  • CONVENIENCE AND SAFETY – Easy to put in 3D filament refills to the the pen, press the button, the pen will auto spit the filaments refills.CE ROHS FCC Certified, PCL environmental protection material.
  • PERFECT FOR STEM LEARNING – As a tactile learning toy, the 3D printing pen inspires creativity, design, planning, building and spatial understanding.allowing kids to turning the imagination in mind into amazing three-dimensional masterpieces.

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Sleek 3D Printed Chairs From Zaha Hadid Architects to be Exhibited at Milan Design Week

At this year’s Milan design week, a new Spanish brand called Nagami will make its debut with four 3D printed chairs designed by Zaha Hadid Architects, Ross Lovegrove and Daniel Widrig. The collection is named Brave New World. 

Each year, thousands of people flock to Italy’s capital of fashion and design for Milan Design Week. The week-long celebration of innovative design is starting up again on April 17, and the new Spanish furniture brand Nagami has a collection that will put visitors on the edge of their seats.

Nagami’s first-ever collection, which will be on display at Milan Design Week, is a set of 3D printed chairs designed by Zaha Hadid Architects, Ross Lovegrove, and Daniel Widrig. The collection is called Brave New World, which is inspired by Aldous Huxley’s classic dystopian novel of the same title.

The prestigious firm Zaha Hadid Architects designed two chairs for the collection; the Bow and the Rise. These sleek and modern furnishings are inspired by marine biology.

The Rise designed by Zaha Hadid Architects

Ross Lovegrove designed a stool called Robotica TM, which focuses on similarities that exist between botany and robotics.

Ross Lovegrove’s Robotica TM stool

The last piece was designed by Daniel Widrig, who used three pieces of PLA to create his “skin-like” Peeler chair. His vision for this seat was to make the seven millimeter thick PLA pieces appear as if they are “peeling off of an invisible joint body.”

nagami

nagamiDaniel Widrig’s 3D printed Peeler chair

“We design products that until now were just waiting for the right technology to come to life: not only objects that you can hold, but also that you can feel and experience as part of your environment,” announced Nagami founders Manuel Jimenez García, Miki Jimenez García, and Ignacio Viguera Ochoa.

Visiting Milan? Sit Down on the Bow and Rise, Robotica TM, or Peeler Chairs

Although the entire collection is made with 3D printing technology, the four different chairs are all made using different materials and techniques.

For example, the Bow and Rise chairs include bright colors because the designer was influenced by underwater ecosystems. The two aquatically-inspired chairs are produced with PLA, but instead of 3D printing with filament, the team opted to use a pellet extruder and raw plastic particles.

nagami

nagamiThe Bow designed by Zaha Hadid Architects

For the Robotica TM stool, Ross Lovegrove draws comparisons between 3D printing and “natural programming” found throughout nature. To create the stool, he used a continuous rotational process, which fuses together each layer in the midst of the printing process. The stool includes heat-proof silicone inserts, making it ideal for use as a table.

The most simplistic of the four chair designs is Widrig’s Peeler chair. It takes just a few hours to achieve the desired effect of three peeling pieces of PLA. In fact, the designer intended for the chair to be produced in a short amount of time with as little material as possible.

“The chair has been designed to satisfy both the ergonomic constraints of the human body, as well as the ergonomics of the robotic arm that prints it,” said Widrig.

Want to check out the work for yourself? Visit Milan’s Brera Design District where Nagami will be exhibiting the chairs at their pop-up showroom. Or, if you can’t make it out to the Lombardy region for the event, check out the furniture company’s website to learn more about the Brave New World collection.

Source: Dezeen 

License: The text of “Sleek 3D Printed Chairs From Zaha Hadid Architects to be Exhibited at Milan Design Week” by All3DP is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

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New Zealand research project explores new design directions for future 3D printed prosthetics

Jan 19, 2018 | By David

As the technology progresses, 3D printed prosthetics are becoming more and more advanced and tailored to the needs of specific types of injuries and lifestyles. A team of researchers based in New Zealand have recently launched a major new project to explore some of the future design possibilities for 3D printing in prosthetics, both in the short term and the long term. Led by the New Zealand Artificial Limb Service, in collaboration with the University of Wellington, the research project also explored the potential for these new developments to be implemented into commercial manufacturing.

The project was roughly organized into four parts, each covering a different design direction that prosthetics could head in with the help of 3D printing. In the short term period, the team focused on new functional fairings and new socket designs, possible in the next 12-18 months. As for a longer period, within the next 7-10 years, multi-density foot printing and information-driven model generation were looked at as possibilities.

The functional fairings concept is geared towards finding new practical applications and uses for prosthetics beyond being just replacements for missing limbs. This could improve the lives of many amputees by transforming what is perceived as a loss into the potential for something more, opening up a space with increased creativity and practicality that only these prosthetic users could access. The team suggested a sport fairing, giving the example of a special prosthetic golf leg. This would have a special golf design as well as an area for spare balls and tees to be stored. There could also be special children’s fairings, with creative designs that appeal to their sense of fun and imagination.

As for the new socket designs, these would be adjustable according to size fluctuations at different times, hopefully making it no harder for a user to put on their prosthetic than for someone to put on a shoe. The team reached out to the Auckland Bioengineering Institute to better understand what might soon be possible for this kind of personalization, with the help of 3D printing technology. Soft tissue scanning can generate an accurate volumetric mesh of a patient’s limb, which allows technicians to visualise what areas of the stump are tolerant or sensitive, or what is hard and what is soft. This means that they would have a better representation of how the socket design should be sculpted. Experiments were carried out with ABS as well as the more advanced TPU material, with the latter being more promising in terms of material properties but coming with an inconveniently long post-processing time.

For the long term, ways to more cheaply produce multi-density foot prosthetics, which are currently prohibitively expensive, were explored. One of 3D printing’s advantages is the way that fill densities can be varied to match desired object performance. This is useful for making prosthetics that are simultaneously stronger and more flexible. To explain this, the team quotes a MIT student talking about the properties of natural structures: “Nature always uses graded materials. Bone, for example, consists of a hard, dense outer shell, and an interior of spongy material. It gives you a high strength-to-weight ratio.’’

There are a number of multi-density 3D printing systems used in other sectors, and the NZALS’ future approaches could take inspiration from these, such as Nervous Systems 3D printed midsole technology for New Balance, or Materialise’s similar system, which is used by Adidas. 3D printed TPU would be the way to go for multi-density prosthetics, and hopefully the technology will advance to make it easier to print with this material in future.

The future of information-driven model generation for prosthetics should see the implementation of the aforementioned soft tissue scanning, as well as what is known as Computational Anatomical Movement. This makes use of scanning, tracking and video analysis so that researchers can examine the force of each muscle, as well as the gait that a particular patient is taking and various other human body movement factors, in order to create a more personalized prosthetic with improved comfort and performance.

The researchers tested out the Stratasys Fortus as well as the UpBox FDM machines, finding pros and cons with each. They concluded that the best solution would be to use an online 3D printing service, which could provide more efficient printing with its specialized expertise and access to a variety of technologies. Shapeways, I.Materialise, and Objective 3D were also suggested as options.

According to NZALS chief executive Sean Gray, New Zealanders are great guinea pigs for developments in prosthesis technology, because they tend to test their limbs to the limits.”People have broken them because they have had them in a ski boot.”, he says. The work carried out by NZALS in collaboration with the University of Wellington and other institutions shows serious promise, and should soon lead to significant improvements in quality of life for amputees there and further afield.

Posted in 3D Printing Application

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