Premium 3D Print Removal Tool Kit – Durable 3D Printer Tools with Sturdy Comfort Grips, Sharp and Hardened Blades for Easy Separation of Prints, Knife and Spatula Set of 2 – Enhanced Version


Are you looking for a 3D print removal toolset with
Solid, riveted handles that won’t come loose and start spinning, twisting or turning after use?
Hardened stainless steel blades that are optimally flexible without being too flimsy and/or getting scratched and gouged by the print bed surface due to their softness?
A knife tool with a sharpened front edge (flat bottom) for getting under even the most-adhered prints with ease?
Ability to reach into the back under larger parts, sweep across and lever them off, as well as handle smaller, more delicate objects?
Durable comfort handles with grips designed for a firm hold that feel good in the hand and look stylish too?
Safe, rounded blades easier on your fingers, prints and printer surface?

REPTOR 3D Print Removal Tools have been designed with all these aspects in mind.
These tools are not your average repurposed painters putty knives with cramp rings that come loose or fall apart before long when used to remove 3D prints!

This REPTOR toolset is designed to get even the most stubborn prints off the bed without distorting them or damaging the print bed surface. Both handles have solid rivets in them that will hold the blades in place and will not permit the blades to turn or yield. The knife with its 4.92″ blade and beveled front edge can be used to sweep across and reach into the back under larger parts and provide leverage to pop even a stubborn piece up while the spatula is thin and flexible enough to get under even the most delicate of objects without distorting them.

They are the perfect duo – practical and durable, yet comfortable and stylish! Get yours now!

Product Features

  • DURABLE, RIGID CONSTRUCTION; No more repurposed artist spatulas with spinning, twisting and turning cramp rings!
  • PRACTICAL BUT TENDER; Gently slide underneath prints with ease to protect the build bed surface yet with a good reach
  • OPTIMUM FLEXIBILITY; Flexible but not too thin or flimsy – not dull and rigid like the putty knives for 3d printer bed
  • STYLISH & VERSATILE; Offset spatula with a rubber comfort grip, knife has a thick wood handle suitable for larger parts
  • PROFESSIONAL ADDITION TO YOUR 3D PRINTER ACCESSORIES; 3D printer tool set for print removal of PLA, PLA+, ABS, PETG etc

Detailed Information available on our Homepage…

Balsa Wood Subsitute Developed for WInd Turbine Blades

CAMBRIDGE, MA – An essential lumber product tucked inside the blades of sleek massive wind turbines is experiencing spot shortages of supply: Balsa wood.

The lightweight wood is used to build  sandwich panel construction that combines light weight and strength. Turbine blades contain arrays of balsa wood strips, much of it sourced from Ecuador, which supplies 95 percent of the world’s demand.

For centuries, the fast-growing balsa tree has been prized for its light weight and stiffness relative to density. But balsa wood is expensive. Natural variations in the wood grain can be an impediment in increasingly precise performance requirements of turbine blades s.

Turbine makers are also producing ever-larger blades—the longest now measure more than 200 feet long, nearly the wingspan of an Airbus A380 jetliner. And they must be engineered to operate virtually maintenance-free for decades. So manufacturers are searching for new sandwich construction material options.

The Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering have developed cellular composite materials that, like wood, are both light weight and stiff. The researchers say the new materials mimic and improve on balsa, and even on the best commercial 3D-printed polymers and polymer composites available.  

“By moving into new classes of materials like epoxies, we open up new avenues for using 3D printing to construct lightweight architectures,” says principal investigator Jennifer A. Lewis, the Hansjörg Wyss Professor of Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard SEAS.

“Balsa wood has a cellular architecture that minimizes its weight since most of the space is empty and only the cell walls carry the load. It therefore has a high specific stiffness and strength,” say Lewis. “We’ve borrowed this design concept and mimicked it in an engineered composite.”

Of particular significance is the way that the fibers can be aligned, through control of the fiber aspect ratio—the length relative to the diameter—and the nozzle diameter.

“This marks an important step forward in designing engineering materials that mimic wood, long known for its remarkable mechanical properties for its weight,” said Lorna Gibson, a professor of materials science and mechanical engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, who was not involved in this research.

Bill Esler, Woodworking Network, WMS

Bill Esler

Bill Esler, Editorial Director, Woodworking Network Bill is responsible for overall content at WoodworkingNetwork.com Woodworking Network magazine, and related newsletters. Bill also manages event programs for Woodworking Network Live conferences at the Woodworking Machinery & Supplies Expo in Toronto and Cabinets & Closets Expo. He developing audience engagement programs using custom digital printing, live lead-generating events, custom websites, and custom digital and print content. Read Bill Esler’s woodworking blogs. He can be reached at besler@woodworkingnetwork.com or follow him on Google+.